Kevan L. Hartshorn, MD
Professor
Boston University School of Medicine
Dept of Medicine
Hematology & Medical Oncology

MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
MA, Williams College




I am a Medical Oncologist Boston University Medical Center with principle focus on solid tumors. I am Director of the Hematology/Oncology Fellowship program at Boston University School of Medicine for 18 years and also on-site PI for multicenter clinical trials of chemotherapy and targeted agents for various cancers. I participates in cooperative clinical trials groups (NSABP, SWOG, Alliance, and AIDs Clinical Trials group) and to a lesser extent in industry related clinical trials. I did my clinical training in Internal Medicine at Boston City Hospital and then did Fellowship training in Hematology/Oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital. After this I joined the Attending staff at Boston City Hospital and feel very devoted to the mission of Boston Medical Center (the name of the Hospital formed by the merger of Boston City Hospital and Boston University Hospital). This mission is to provide, “Exceptional Care Without Exception”. Boston Medical Center is the main safety net hospital for the city of Boston and prides itself on providing cutting edge care to patient’s regardless or economic or social status. The hospital cares for a large population of African American and immigrant patients and has developed a number of special services (e.g. care navigators) to under-served patients get the care they need. In addition to the above clinical research interests, I have a particular interest in Geriatric Oncology and shared in developing a clinical Fellowship in Geriatric Oncology here which has now been in existence for about 10 years. I have a long standing interest in health care disparities as well. I have mentored numerous Fellows, Medical Students, Residents and College and High School students over the years in clinical care, clinical research and basic research.

In addition to my clinical interests have a laboratory research program related to innate immunology have had continuous NIH grant support for 30 years. Our research principally deals with innate immunity, which refers to immune responses that are hard-wired into the genome and provide a first line of protection against infection or transformed cells. Innate immune responses are sometimes also responsible for damaging inflammation. Defects or variants in innate immunity account for increased propensity for infections or harmful inflammation. As an example, people lacking one of the collectins found in blood are at greater risk for infection during neutropenia and have a greater risk for certain cancers. There is surprising complexity and specificity to innate immunity despite the fact that it provides protection even when a person has not been exposed to a specific infection. The main aspects of innate immunity we study include neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages, toll like receptors, and soluble immune defense proteins called collectins and defensins. We study how neutrophils and monocytes become activated in response to infectious organisms (viruses and bacteria), including studies of cell signaling, phagocytosis and oxidant production. We study how defensins and collectins kill bacteria or viruses and promote their uptake by neutrophils and monocytes. We have created or collaborate to create and test a variety of new recombinant versions of collectins and defensins, some of which have strongly increased antiviral or antibacterial activity. We also collaborate with members of the department of Biophysics in crystallographic studies of collectin structure in order to predict protein changes that might confer greater antimicrobial activity. We also collaborate in use of mouse models (e.g., mice in which collectin genes are deleted) to study the role of specific innate immune mediators in infection. A particular area of interest for us is the innate immune response to respiratory infection, especially influenza virus infection. Influenza virus and HIV (which we also study to some extent) are important examples of infections for which innate immunity is important since these viruses undergo continuous mutation thus evading adaptive immune responses (i.e., specific T and B cell responses).

Member
Boston University
BU-BMC Cancer Center


Member
Boston University
Pulmonary Center


Graduate Faculty (Primary Mentor of Grad Students)
Boston University School of Medicine, Graduate Medical Sciences


Active Staff Privileges
Boston Medical Center
Medicine
Hematology & Medical Oncology


2017 Boston University Medical Center: Reward for Excellence as Training Program Director (Hematology Oncology Fellowship)
2010-2020 Boston Magazine: Selected as one of Boston's Top Doctors Annually 2010 - 2020
1982-1983 Boston City Hospital: Residency Training – Elected Co-President of House Officers Association
Albert Einstein College of Medicine: Alpha Omega Alpha
Williams College: Honors in English, Cum Laude


A Randomized, Double-blind, Phase II Study of RAD001 10 mg/d plus Best Supportive Care versus Placebeo plus Best Supportive Care in the Treatment of Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Neuroendocri
04/04/2008 - 04/30/2011 (PI)
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation


A randomized, double-blind, multi-center phase III study comparing everolimus (RAD001) plus best supportive care vs placebo, plus best best supportive care in patients with advanced gastric cance
03/16/2010 - 02/28/2011 (PI)
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation


A Phase II, Multi-center, Open-label Trial to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of DAVANAT in Combination with 5-Fluorouracil when Administered as First Line Chemotherapy in Patients Advanced Bili
07/05/2007 - 07/04/2010 (PI)
Pro-Pharmaceuticals, Inc.


A Randomized, Open-Label Trial Comparing Two Avastin (bevacizumab)- Based Treatment Regimens for the First-Line Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer
05/17/2006 - 12/31/2009 (PI)
Genentech, Inc.

Enhancing Collectin Mediated Host Defense
04/01/1998 - 03/31/2003 (PI)
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
5 R01 HL58910 04

An Open Label, Randomized, Controlled, Phase III, Multicenter, Clinical Trial of PN401 with HighDose 5-Fluoraouracil (5FU) vs. Gemcitabine for Treatment of Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer
12/01/2001 - 11/30/2002 (PI)
Pro-Neuron


NGM 120: A Phase 1a/b Dose-Escalation Study Followed by Expansion Cohorts of NGM120, a GFRAL…
01/03/2020 - 01/02/2023 (PI)
NGM Biopharmaceuticals, Inc.

Merck 937: A Phase 3 Double-blinded, Two-arm Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Pembrolizu
08/15/2019 - 08/31/2022 (PI)
Merck

EL CENTRO: Engaging Latinos in the CENter of Cancer TReatment Options
09/01/2017 - 08/31/2020 (PI)
Dana Farber NIH-NCI

Enhancing Collectin Mediated Defense Against Influenza
07/01/2015 - 06/30/2020 (PI)
NIH-NHLBI
5R01HL069031-17

Pulmonary Epithelial Dynamics and Innate Host Defense
12/07/2017 - 11/30/2019 (PI)
Univ of Cincinnati NIH-NHLBI
1R01HL135122-01A1

The JANUS 1 Study
08/26/2015 - 08/31/2019 (PI)
Incyte Corporation

MK-3475-177-00
11/17/2017 - 03/31/2019 (PI)
Merck

A Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase 3 Study of the JAK 1/2 Inhibitor Ruxolitinib of Placebo in Comb…
01/15/2015 - 01/31/2019 (PI)
Incyte Corporation

Enhancing Collectin Medicated Defense Against Influenza
08/11/2011 - 06/30/2015 (PI)
NIH-NHLBI
5R01 HL069031-12

Development of Novel Immunotherapy for Influenza Virus Infection
09/01/2007 - 08/31/2013 (PI)
Mass General Hosp NIH-NIAID

Showing 10 of 16 results. Show All Results

Title


Yr Title Project-Sub Proj Pubs
2018 Enhancing Collectin Mediated Defense Against Influenza 5R01HL069031-17 41
2017 Enhancing Collectin Mediated Defense Against Influenza 5R01HL069031-16 41
2016 Enhancing Collectin Mediated Defense Against Influenza 5R01HL069031-15 41
2015 Enhancing Collectin Mediated Defense Against Influenza 2R01HL069031-14 41
2014 Enhancing Collectin Mediated Defense Against Influenza 5R01HL069031-13 41
2013 Enhancing Collectin Mediated Defense Against Influenza 5R01HL069031-12 41
2012 Enhancing Collectin Mediated Defense Against Influenza 5R01HL069031-11 41
2011 Enhancing Collectin Mediated Defense Against Influenza 2R01HL069031-10 41
2010 Collectin-Mediated Defense Against Influenza 5R01HL069031-09 41
2009 Collectin-Mediated Defense Against Influenza 5R01HL069031-08 41
Showing 10 of 29 results. Show All Results

Publications listed below are automatically derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and other sources, which might result in incorrect or missing publications. Faculty can login to make corrections and additions.

iCite Analysis       Copy PMIDs To Clipboard

  1. Hsieh IN, Deluna X, White MR, Hartshorn KL. Histone H4 directly stimulates neutrophil activation through membrane permeabilization. J Leukoc Biol. 2020 Aug 17. PMID: 32803840
     
  2. Parsons LM, An Y, Qi L, White MR, van der Woude R, Hartshorn KL, Taubenberger JK, de Vries RP, Cipollo JF. Influenza Virus Hemagglutinins H2, H5, H6, and H11 Are Not Targets of Pulmonary Surfactant Protein D: N-Glycan Subtypes in Host-Pathogen Interactions. J Virol. 2020 02 14; 94(5). PMID: 31826991
     
  3. Boehmer U, Potter J, Clark MA, Ozonoff A, Ceballos RM, Winter M, Hartshorn KL. Neighborhood Characteristics and Colorectal Cancer Survivors' Quality of Care. Health Equity. 2019; 3(1):619-627.View Related Profiles. PMID: 31872167
     
  4. van Eijk M, Hillaire MLB, Rimmelzwaan GF, Rynkiewicz MJ, White MR, Hartshorn KL, Hessing M, Koolmees PA, Tersteeg MH, van Es MH, Meijerhof T, Huckriede A, Haagsman HP. Enhanced Antiviral Activity of Human Surfactant Protein D by Site-Specific Engineering of the Carbohydrate Recognition Domain. Front Immunol. 2019; 10:2476.View Related Profiles. PMID: 31749796
     
  5. Keating M, Giscombe L, Tannous T, Hartshorn K. Prolonged Treatment Response to Pembrolizumab in a Patient with Pretreated Metastatic Colon Cancer and Lynch Syndrome. Case Rep Oncol Med. 2019; 2019:3847672. PMID: 31565451
     
  6. Sheikh AR, Yameen H, Hartshorn K. Treatment of Rectal Cancer in Older Adults. Curr Oncol Rep. 2018 11 20; 20(12):102. PMID: 30456634
     
  7. Elias R, Hartshorn K, Rahma O, Lin N, Snyder-Cappione JE. Aging,?immune senescence,?and immunotherapy:?A comprehensive review. Semin Oncol. 2018 08; 45(4):187-200.View Related Profiles. PMID: 30539714
     
  8. Shin TH, Inagaki E, Ganta T, Hartshorn K, Litle VR, Suzuki K. Tumor Lysis Syndrome After Bilobectomy for Typical Carcinoid Tumor of the Lung. Ann Thorac Surg. 2019 03; 107(3):e199-e201.View Related Profiles. PMID: 30218665
     
  9. Kumaradevan S, Lee SY, Richards S, Lyle C, Zhao Q, Tapan U, Jiangliu Y, Ghumman S, Walker J, Belghasem M, Arinze N, Kuhnen A, Weinberg J, Francis J, Hartshorn K, Kolachalama VB, Cifuentes D, Rahimi N, Chitalia VC. c-Cbl Expression Correlates with Human Colorectal Cancer Survival and Its Wnt/ß-Catenin Suppressor Function Is Regulated by Tyr371 Phosphorylation. Am J Pathol. 2018 08; 188(8):1921-1933.View Related Profiles. PMID: 30029779; DOI: 10.1016/j.ajpath.2018.05.007;
     
  10. Hsieh IN, De Luna X, White MR, Hartshorn KL. The Role and Molecular Mechanism of Action of Surfactant Protein D in Innate Host Defense Against Influenza A Virus. Front Immunol. 2018; 9:1368. PMID: 29951070
     
Showing 10 of 170 results. Show More

This graph shows the total number of publications by year, by first, middle/unknown, or last author.

Bar chart showing 170 publications over 36 distinct years, with a maximum of 11 publications in 2012

YearPublications
19851
19862
19876
19882
19892
19905
19911
19924
19933
19945
19951
19966
19971
19983
19994
20007
20017
20026
20033
20043
20055
20065
20075
20084
200910
20109
20117
201211
20137
20146
20154
20168
20175
20187
20193
20202

In addition to these self-described keywords below, a list of MeSH based concepts is available here.

Gastrointestinal cancer
Innate Immunity
Neutrophils
Geriatric Oncology
Gastrointestinal Oncology
Respiratory viruses
Contact for Mentoring:

650 Albany St Evans Biomed Research Ctr
Boston MA 02118
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