Keywords
Last Name

Robin R. Ingalls, MD

TitleProfessor
InstitutionBoston University School of Medicine
DepartmentMedicine
DivisionInfectious Diseases
Address650 Albany St Evans Biomed Research Ctr
Boston MA 02118
Phone(617) 414-4778
ORCID ORCID Icon0000-0003-2197-7198
Other Positions
TitleGraduate Faculty (Primary Mentor of Grad Students)
InstitutionBoston University School of Medicine, Division of Graduate Medical Sciences

TitleProfessor
InstitutionBoston University School of Medicine
DepartmentMicrobiology

TitleActive Staff Privileges
InstitutionBoston Medical Center
DepartmentMedicine
DivisionInfectious Diseases

 Research Expertise & Professional Interests
The ability of innate immune system to sense invasion by a pathogenic organism and respond appropriately in order to control infection is paramount to survival. To that end, an array of receptors and binding proteins has evolved as part of the innate immune system to detect invading microorganisms. My laboratory is interested in Toll-like receptors and the intracellular signaling pathways that contribute to the innate recognition of Gram-negative bacteria, with a particular focus on mucosal immunity. We have a variety of in vitro and in vivo models in the laboratory to address the interaction of Neisseria and Chlamydia species with epithelial cells and macrophages.

One major focus of the laboratory is exploring the role of TLR2 in host defense against C. trachomatis. Previous work in our laboratory established a role for TLR2 in cellular responses to chlamydia species. In our recent in vivo work we have observed that TLR2 plays a protective role in the lung but a detrimental role in the genital tract during infected of mice with the mouse pathogen, C. muridarum. The goal of this project is to determine the specific cell types that are responsible for this difference. As part of this project, we are also trying to identify the specific ligands in chlamydia that are important for TLR2-dependent and independent cell activation, and characterize TLR2 signaling mutant strains of chlamydia that lack the cryptic plasmid.

A second focus of the laboratory is exploring the role TLRs and NLRs in host defense against N. gonorrhoeae. Previous work in our laboratory established a role for TLR4 and TLR2 in cellular responses to Neisseria species in vitro and we have recently completed in vitro studies that also demonstrate that gonorrhea can activate Nod receptors. Our ongoing in vivo studies in TLR4 mutant mice demonstrate that TLR4 is important for early bacterial clearance and neutrophil function, and we plan to complete studies in TLR2 and Nod1/2 mutant mice when back breeding is complete.

The third focus of the laboratory relates to the role of innate immunity on regulating acute and chronic inflammation associated with the respiratory pathogen Chlamydophila pneumoniae. We are in the process of defining the specific receptors and ligands that are responsible for IL-1b activation during infection, and will investigate the role of IL-1b in C. pneumoniae-induced atherosclerosis.

 Self-Described Keywords
  • Host-Pathogen Interactions
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Innate Immunity
  • Sepsis
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections
 Publications
Publications listed below are automatically derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and other sources, which might result in incorrect or missing publications. Faculty can login to make corrections and additions.
List All   |   Timeline
  1. Aqeel Y, Rodriguez R, Chatterjee A, Ingalls RR, Samuelson J. Killing of diverse eye pathogens (Acanthamoeba spp., Fusarium solani, and Chlamydia trachomatis) with alcohols. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2017 Feb; 11(2):e0005382. PMID: 28182670.
    View in: PubMed
  2. Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb YB, Mekasha S, He X, Gibson FC, Ingalls RR. Signaling events in pathogen-induced macrophage foam cell formation. Pathog Dis. 2016 08; 74(6). PMID: 27481727.
    View in: PubMed
  3. Pudney J, He X, Masheeb Z, Kindelberger DW, Kuohung W, Ingalls RR. Differential expression of toll-like receptors in the human placenta across early gestation. Placenta. 2016 Oct; 46:1-10. PMID: 27697215.
    View in: PubMed
  4. He X, Liang Y, LaValley MP, Lai J, Ingalls RR. Comparative analysis of the growth and biological activity of a respiratory and atheroma isolate of Chlamydia pneumoniae reveals strain-dependent differences in inflammatory activity and innate immune evasion. BMC Microbiol. 2015; 15:228. PMID: 26494400.
    View in: PubMed
  5. Beaulieu LM, Clancy L, Tanriverdi K, Benjamin EJ, Kramer CD, Weinberg EO, He X, Mekasha S, Mick E, Ingalls RR, Genco CA, Freedman JE. Specific Inflammatory Stimuli Lead to Distinct Platelet Responses in Mice and Humans. PLoS One. 2015; 10(7):e0131688. PMID: 26148065.
    View in: PubMed
  6. Kramer CD, Weinberg EO, Gower AC, He X, Mekasha S, Slocum C, Beaulieu LM, Wetzler L, Alekseyev Y, Gibson FC, Freedman JE, Ingalls RR, Genco CA. Distinct gene signatures in aortic tissue from ApoE-/- mice exposed to pathogens or Western diet. BMC Genomics. 2014; 15:1176. PMID: 25540039.
    View in: PubMed
  7. Islam A, Marathe JG, Pudney J, Ayehunie S, Ingalls RR, Anderson DJ. Effects of endogenous and exogenous female reproductive hormones on gene expression and barrier function in female genital epithelia. AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 2014 Oct; 30 Suppl 1:A228. PMID: 25357642.
    View in: PubMed
  8. He X, Berland R, Mekasha S, Christensen TG, Alroy J, Kramnik I, Ingalls RR. The sst1 resistance locus regulates evasion of type I interferon signaling by Chlamydia pneumoniae as a disease tolerance mechanism. PLoS Pathog. 2013; 9(8):e1003569. PMID: 24009502.
    View in: PubMed
  9. Roseman DA, Kabbani D, Kwah J, Bird D, Ingalls R, Gautam A, Nuhn M, Francis JM. Strongyloides stercoralis transmission by kidney transplantation in two recipients from a common donor. Am J Transplant. 2013 Sep; 13(9):2483-6. PMID: 23919410.
    View in: PubMed
  10. Mavrogiorgos N, Mekasha S, Yang Y, Kelliher MA, Ingalls RR. Activation of NOD receptors by Neisseria gonorrhoeae modulates the innate immune response. Innate Immun. 2014 May; 20(4):377-89. PMID: 23884094.
    View in: PubMed
  11. Frazer LC, Darville T, Chandra-Kuntal K, Andrews CW, Zurenski M, Mintus M, AbdelRahman YM, Belland RJ, Ingalls RR, O'Connell CM. Plasmid-cured Chlamydia caviae activates TLR2-dependent signaling and retains virulence in the guinea pig model of genital tract infection. PLoS One. 2012; 7(1):e30747. PMID: 22292031.
    View in: PubMed
  12. Hawley KL, Olson CM, Iglesias-Pedraz JM, Navasa N, Cervantes JL, Caimano MJ, Izadi H, Ingalls RR, Pal U, Salazar JC, Radolf JD, Anguita J. CD14 cooperates with complement receptor 3 to mediate MyD88-independent phagocytosis of Borrelia burgdorferi. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Jan 24; 109(4):1228-32. PMID: 22232682.
    View in: PubMed
  13. Packiam M, Wu H, Veit SJ, Mavrogiorgos N, Jerse AE, Ingalls RR. Protective role of Toll-like receptor 4 in experimental gonococcal infection of female mice. Mucosal Immunol. 2012 Jan; 5(1):19-29. PMID: 21937985.
    View in: PubMed
  14. He X, Nair A, Mekasha S, Alroy J, O'Connell CM, Ingalls RR. Enhanced virulence of Chlamydia muridarum respiratory infections in the absence of TLR2 activation. PLoS One. 2011; 6(6):e20846. PMID: 21695078.
    View in: PubMed
  15. He X, Mekasha S, Mavrogiorgos N, Fitzgerald KA, Lien E, Ingalls RR. Inflammation and fibrosis during Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is regulated by IL-1 and the NLRP3/ASC inflammasome. J Immunol. 2010 May 15; 184(10):5743-54. PMID: 20393140.
    View in: PubMed
  16. Han ES, Mekasha S, Ingalls RR. Fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) is expressed in the lower genital tract and may play a role in amplifying inflammation during infection. J Reprod Immunol. 2010 Jan; 84(1):16-23. PMID: 19963275.
    View in: PubMed
  17. Packiam M, Veit SJ, Anderson DJ, Ingalls RR, Jerse AE. Mouse strain-dependent differences in susceptibility to Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection and induction of innate immune responses. Infect Immun. 2010 Jan; 78(1):433-40. PMID: 19901062.
    View in: PubMed
  18. O'Connell CM, Ingalls RR, Andrews CW, Scurlock AM, Darville T. Plasmid-deficient Chlamydia muridarum fail to induce immune pathology and protect against oviduct disease. J Immunol. 2007 Sep 15; 179(6):4027-34. PMID: 17785841.
    View in: PubMed
  19. Andersen JM, Al-Khairy D, Ingalls RR. Innate immunity at the mucosal surface: role of toll-like receptor 3 and toll-like receptor 9 in cervical epithelial cell responses to microbial pathogens. Biol Reprod. 2006 May; 74(5):824-31. PMID: 16421230.
    View in: PubMed
  20. O'Connell CM, Ionova IA, Quayle AJ, Visintin A, Ingalls RR. Localization of TLR2 and MyD88 to Chlamydia trachomatis inclusions. Evidence for signaling by intracellular TLR2 during infection with an obligate intracellular pathogen. J Biol Chem. 2006 Jan 20; 281(3):1652-9. PMID: 16293622.
    View in: PubMed
  21. Fisette PL, Ram S, Andersen JM, Guo W, Ingalls RR. The Lip lipoprotein from Neisseria gonorrhoeae stimulates cytokine release and NF-kappaB activation in epithelial cells in a Toll-like receptor 2-dependent manner. J Biol Chem. 2003 Nov 21; 278(47):46252-60. PMID: 12966099.
    View in: PubMed
  22. Henneke P, Takeuchi O, Malley R, Lien E, Ingalls RR, Freeman MW, Mayadas T, Nizet V, Akira S, Kasper DL, Golenbock DT. Cellular activation, phagocytosis, and bactericidal activity against group B streptococcus involve parallel myeloid differentiation factor 88-dependent and independent signaling pathways. J Immunol. 2002 Oct 1; 169(7):3970-7. PMID: 12244198.
    View in: PubMed
  23. Fichorova RN, Cronin AO, Lien E, Anderson DJ, Ingalls RR. Response to Neisseria gonorrhoeae by cervicovaginal epithelial cells occurs in the absence of toll-like receptor 4-mediated signaling. J Immunol. 2002 Mar 1; 168(5):2424-32. PMID: 11859134.
    View in: PubMed
  24. Lien E, Ingalls RR. Toll-like receptors. Crit Care Med. 2002 Jan; 30(1 Supp):S1-S11. PMID: 11839939.
    View in: PubMed
  25. Lien E, Ingalls RR. Toll-like receptors. Crit Care Med. 2002 Jan; 30(1 Suppl):S1-11. PMID: 11782555.
    View in: PubMed
  26. Medvedev AE, Henneke P, Schromm A, Lien E, Ingalls R, Fenton MJ, Golenbock DT, Vogel SN. Induction of tolerance to lipopolysaccharide and mycobacterial components in Chinese hamster ovary/CD14 cells is not affected by overexpression of Toll-like receptors 2 or 4. J Immunol. 2001 Aug 15; 167(4):2257-67. PMID: 11490013.
    View in: PubMed
  27. Ingalls RR, Lien E, Golenbock DT. Membrane-associated proteins of a lipopolysaccharide-deficient mutant of Neisseria meningitidis activate the inflammatory response through toll-like receptor 2. Infect Immun. 2001 Apr; 69(4):2230-6. PMID: 11254578.
    View in: PubMed
  28. Flo TH, Ryan L, Kilaas L, Skjâk-Braek G, Ingalls RR, Sundan A, Golenbock DT, Espevik T. Involvement of CD14 and beta2-integrins in activating cells with soluble and particulate lipopolysaccharides and mannuronic acid polymers. Infect Immun. 2000 Dec; 68(12):6770-6. PMID: 11083794.
    View in: PubMed
  29. Moore KJ, Andersson LP, Ingalls RR, Monks BG, Li R, Arnaout MA, Golenbock DT, Freeman MW. Divergent response to LPS and bacteria in CD14-deficient murine macrophages. J Immunol. 2000 Oct 15; 165(8):4272-80. PMID: 11035061.
    View in: PubMed
  30. Lien E, Means TK, Heine H, Yoshimura A, Kusumoto S, Fukase K, Fenton MJ, Oikawa M, Qureshi N, Monks B, Finberg RW, Ingalls RR, Golenbock DT. Toll-like receptor 4 imparts ligand-specific recognition of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. J Clin Invest. 2000 Feb; 105(4):497-504. PMID: 10683379.
    View in: PubMed
  31. Ingalls RR, Lien E, Golenbock DT. Differential roles of TLR2 and TLR4 in the host response to Gram-negative bacteria: lessons from a lipopolysaccharide-deficient mutant of Neisseria meningitidis. J Endotoxin Res. 2000; 6(5):411-5. PMID: 11521065.
    View in: PubMed
  32. Lien E, Sellati TJ, Yoshimura A, Flo TH, Rawadi G, Finberg RW, Carroll JD, Espevik T, Ingalls RR, Radolf JD, Golenbock DT. Toll-like receptor 2 functions as a pattern recognition receptor for diverse bacterial products. J Biol Chem. 1999 Nov 19; 274(47):33419-25. PMID: 10559223.
    View in: PubMed
  33. Yoshimura A, Lien E, Ingalls RR, Tuomanen E, Dziarski R, Golenbock D. Cutting edge: recognition of Gram-positive bacterial cell wall components by the innate immune system occurs via Toll-like receptor 2. J Immunol. 1999 Jul 1; 163(1):1-5. PMID: 10384090.
    View in: PubMed
  34. Ingalls RR, Heine H, Lien E, Yoshimura A, Golenbock D. Lipopolysaccharide recognition, CD14, and lipopolysaccharide receptors. Infect Dis Clin North Am. 1999 Jun; 13(2):341-53, vii. PMID: 10340170.
    View in: PubMed
  35. Ingalls RR, Monks BG, Golenbock DT. Membrane expression of soluble endotoxin-binding proteins permits lipopolysaccharide signaling in Chinese hamster ovary fibroblasts independently of CD14. J Biol Chem. 1999 May 14; 274(20):13993-8. PMID: 10318811.
    View in: PubMed
  36. Ingalls RR, Monks BG, Savedra R, Christ WJ, Delude RL, Medvedev AE, Espevik T, Golenbock DT. CD11/CD18 and CD14 share a common lipid A signaling pathway. J Immunol. 1998 Nov 15; 161(10):5413-20. PMID: 9820516.
    View in: PubMed
  37. Delude RL, Yoshimura A, Ingalls RR, Golenbock DT. Construction of a lipopolysaccharide reporter cell line and its use in identifying mutants defective in endotoxin, but not TNF-alpha, signal transduction. J Immunol. 1998 Sep 15; 161(6):3001-9. PMID: 9743364.
    View in: PubMed
  38. Medvedev AE, Flo T, Ingalls RR, Golenbock DT, Teti G, Vogel SN, Espevik T. Involvement of CD14 and complement receptors CR3 and CR4 in nuclear factor-kappaB activation and TNF production induced by lipopolysaccharide and group B streptococcal cell walls. J Immunol. 1998 May 1; 160(9):4535-42. PMID: 9574560.
    View in: PubMed
  39. Ingalls RR, Arnaout MA, Delude RL, Flaherty S, Savedra R, Golenbock DT. The CD11/CD18 integrins: characterization of three novel LPS signaling receptors. Prog Clin Biol Res. 1998; 397:107-17. PMID: 9575552.
    View in: PubMed
  40. Wurfel MM, Monks BG, Ingalls RR, Dedrick RL, Delude R, Zhou D, Lamping N, Schumann RR, Thieringer R, Fenton MJ, Wright SD, Golenbock D. Targeted deletion of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein gene leads to profound suppression of LPS responses ex vivo, whereas in vivo responses remain intact. J Exp Med. 1997 Dec 15; 186(12):2051-6. PMID: 9396775.
    View in: PubMed
  41. Flaherty SF, Golenbock DT, Milham FH, Ingalls RR. CD11/CD18 leukocyte integrins: new signaling receptors for bacterial endotoxin. J Surg Res. 1997 Nov; 73(1):85-9. PMID: 9441798.
    View in: PubMed
  42. Ingalls RR, Arnaout MA, Golenbock DT. Outside-in signaling by lipopolysaccharide through a tailless integrin. J Immunol. 1997 Jul 1; 159(1):433-8. PMID: 9200483.
    View in: PubMed
  43. Levitz SM, Tabuni A, Kozel TR, MacGill RS, Ingalls RR, Golenbock DT. Binding of Cryptococcus neoformans to heterologously expressed human complement receptors. Infect Immun. 1997 Mar; 65(3):931-5. PMID: 9038299.
    View in: PubMed
  44. Savedra R, Delude RL, Ingalls RR, Fenton MJ, Golenbock DT. Mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan recognition requires a receptor that shares components of the endotoxin signaling system. J Immunol. 1996 Sep 15; 157(6):2549-54. PMID: 8805656.
    View in: PubMed
  45. Ingalls RR, Rice PA, Qureshi N, Takayama K, Lin JS, Golenbock DT. The inflammatory cytokine response to Chlamydia trachomatis infection is endotoxin mediated. Infect Immun. 1995 Aug; 63(8):3125-30. PMID: 7542638.
    View in: PubMed
  46. Ingalls RR, Golenbock DT. CD11c/CD18, a transmembrane signaling receptor for lipopolysaccharide. J Exp Med. 1995 Apr 1; 181(4):1473-9. PMID: 7535339.
    View in: PubMed
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