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Search Results to Lindsay Farrer, PhD

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Research Expertise & Professional Interests Dr. Lindsay Farrer is a medical geneticist at Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health where he is the Boston University Distinguished Professor of Genetics, Chief of Biomedical Genetics, and a Professor of Medicine, Neurology, Ophthalmology, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics. Dr. Farrer is a graduate of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, received his Ph.D. from the Indiana University School of Medicine, and gained additional training in genetic epidemiology at Yale University. He holds adjunct faculty positions at Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Bedford, Massachusetts. He is a Founding Fellow of the American College of Medical Genetics. Dr. Farrer teaches several courses in human genetics and addiction science at Boston University, directs the BU Transformative Training Program in Addiction Science (TTPAS) that features transdisciplinary training for students enrolled in PhD programs across the Medical and Charles River campuses, directs Boston University’s Molecular Genetics Core Facility which offers DNA genotyping and sequencing services to investigators at Boston University and elsewhere, and provides genetic counseling and testing to patients with a variety of inherited conditions. Dr. Farrer’s research has lead to more than 450 publications on genetic risk factors for several familial neurodegenerative and other chronic diseases. In collaboration with other laboratories worldwide, his group has localized genes causing a variety of rare and common disorders, most notably Alzheimer disease (AD), substance use disorders (SUDs), age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Wilson disease, Machado-Joseph disease, Waardenburg syndrome, hypertension, sensorineural deafness, and osteoarthritis. His group identified a functional genetic variant in the complement factor H gene which accounts for more than 30% of the attributable risk for AMD, the leading cause of progressive vision loss and blindness in the elderly. In collaboration with other researchers, Dr. Farrer is conducting genome wide association studies (GWAS) and whole genome/exome sequencing studies for several disorders including AD, SUDs (cocaine, opiates, nicotine, alcohol and cannabis), and AMD. Dr. Farrer’s team is also developing methods for locating genes that influence the natural history of complex diseases and pharmacogenetic response. Under Dr. Farrer’s leadership, the MIRAGE Project, a multi-center study of AD funded since 1991 by the National Institute on Aging, has made several important contributions to our understanding of the interactions between genetic and environmental factors for the disorder. This study has a particular emphasis on the genetics of AD in African Americans. MIRAGE was the first study to demonstrate that genetic factors have a major role in the development of AD and that APOE e4 is more weakly associated with disease in men and persons older than 75 years. Dr. Farrer co-directed the international effort which demonstrated that SORL1 is genetically and functionally associated with AD, thus implicating intracellular protein trafficking as integral pathway in AD. His laboratory conducted genome wide association studies (GWAS) for AD in several populations including African Americans and an inbred Israeli-Arab community, and identified rare AD causal mutations in the AKAP9 gene which are specific to African Americans. Dr. Farrer serves on the Executive Committee of the national Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium and co-directs the data analysis effort for this large NIH-funded project. He is also a Principal Investigator of the national Alzheimer Disease Sequencing Project and a study to identify AD risk and protective variants in Koreans.

One or more keywords matched the following items that are connected to Farrer, Lindsay

Item TypeName
Concept Craniocerebral Trauma
Concept Information Systems
Concept Trauma Severity Indices
Concept Amino Acid Transport Systems, Basic
Concept Systems Biology
Concept Adult Survivors of Child Abuse
Concept Gene-Environment Interaction
Concept Protein Interaction Maps
Academic Article Stratification techniques to explore genotype environment interactions.
Academic Article Head injury and the risk of AD in the MIRAGE study.
Academic Article The human cationic amino acid transporter (ATRC1): physical and genetic mapping to 13q12-q14.
Academic Article Comparison of Alzheimer's disease risk factors in white and African American families.
Academic Article Postmenopausal hormone therapy and Alzheimer's disease risk: interaction with age.
Academic Article Interaction between two independent CNR1 variants increases risk for cocaine dependence in European Americans: a replication study in family-based sample and population-based sample.
Academic Article Convergence of linkage, gene expression and association data demonstrates the influence of the RAR-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) gene on neovascular AMD: a systems biology based approach.
Academic Article Interactive effect of stressful life events and the serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR genotype on posttraumatic stress disorder diagnosis in 2 independent populations.
Academic Article Interaction of FKBP5 with childhood adversity on risk for post-traumatic stress disorder.
Academic Article Meta-analysis confirms CR1, CLU, and PICALM as alzheimer disease risk loci and reveals interactions with APOE genotypes.
Academic Article 5-HTTLPR as a potential moderator of the effects of adverse childhood experiences on risk of antisocial personality disorder.
Academic Article A CRHR1 haplotype moderates the effect of adverse childhood experiences on lifetime risk of major depressive episode in African-American women.
Academic Article Childhood adversity increases risk for nicotine dependence and interacts with a5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor genotype specifically in males.
Academic Article Systems biology-based analysis implicates a novel role for vitamin D metabolism in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration.
Academic Article Automating data manipulation for genetic analysis using a data base management system.
Academic Article Integrating GWASs and human protein interaction networks identifies a gene subnetwork underlying alcohol dependence.
Academic Article Structural interactions between inhibitor and substrate docking sites give insight into mechanisms of human PS1 complexes.
Academic Article Genetic factor common to schizophrenia and HIV infection is associated with risky sexual behavior: antagonistic vs. synergistic pleiotropic SNPs enriched for distinctly different biological functions.
Academic Article Discovery of gene-gene interactions across multiple independent data sets of late onset Alzheimer disease from the Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium.
Academic Article S100A10 identified in a genome-wide gene × cannabis dependence interaction analysis of risky sexual behaviours.
Grant Family Based Studies of Gene-Environment Interactions in Alzheimer’s Disease
Academic Article Rare coding variants in PLCG2, ABI3, and TREM2 implicate microglial-mediated innate immunity in Alzheimer''s disease.
Academic Article Oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms, attachment, and PTSD: Results from the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study.
Academic Article Ancestry-specific and sex-specific risk alleles identified in a genome-wide gene-by-alcohol dependence interaction study of risky sexual behaviors.
Academic Article FUS Phase Separation Is Modulated by a Molecular Chaperone and Methylation of Arginine Cation-p Interactions.
Academic Article One for all and all for One: Improving replication of genetic studies through network diffusion.
Academic Article Identification of Gene-Gene Interactions in Alzheimer Disease Using CoOperative Game Theory
Academic Article Variation in TMEM106B in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.
Academic Article A systems biology approach towards understanding and treating non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

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