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Research Expertise & Professional Interests Andrea Havasi, M.D. is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Boston University. She is board certified in Internal Medicine and Nephrology. As a recipient of the National Kidney Foundation Research Fellow Award, she undertook research training at BMC investigating the cytoprotective mechanisms of heat shock proteins in ischemic renal cell injury and apoptosis. She joined the Renal Section Faculty in 2008, and continues basic and translational research in the area of renal cell injury and proteinuric kidney diseases using cell culture and animal models. She is the recipient of the American Heart Association Scientist Development Grant and NIH K08 award. She also has a special clinical and research interest in onco-nephrology and amyloidosis, and is a faculty in BU’s Amyloidosis Center. Dr. Havasi is a Co-Director of BU’s Mitochondria Affinity Research Collaborative, and Director of Nephrology Fellowship Program’s Onco-nephrology / Amyloidosis Pathway. Her clinical roles include attending time on the consult and dialysis/transplant services and weekly outpatient clinics (amyloidosis, chronic kidney disease, hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis clinics). Current research interest: 1. Amyloid renal disease Mechanism of amyloid fibril formation and deposition in the kidney. 2. Proteinuria and renal fibrosis Mechanisms of proteinuria induced tubular damage, interstitial fibrosis and inflammation in progressive kidney diseases. Proteinuria is associated with progressive chronic kidney disease. It is well known that exposure of proximal tubular epithelial cells to large amounts of albumin leads to the development of tubular atrophy and fibrosis. However, the possible pathogenic role of albumin in this process has not been fully elucidated. Development of new therapeutic tools to prevent or slow the progression of proteinuric chronic kidney disease requires clear understanding of the effect of proteinuria on tubular cell function.

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  • Proteinuria