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Search Results to Toby C. Chai, MD

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Research Expertise & Professional Interests Toby C. Chai, MD, is Chief of Urology at Boston Medical Center, and Professor and Chair of the Department of Urology at Boston University School of Medicine. He also serves as President of Boston University Medical Center Urologists, Inc. Dr. Chai was previously Professor of Urology and Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences at Yale University School of Medicine. He served as Vice Chair of Research in the Department of Urology and Co-Director of the Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery Program at Yale New Haven Hospital. Dr. Chai completed his medical degree at Indiana University School of Medicine, his urology residency at University of Michigan Medical Center, and a fellowship at University of Virginia. Prior to joining Yale, he held the John D. Young Professorship in Urology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Chai has published 150 papers, reviews, and medical texts. He serves on the editorial board of the American Journal of Physiology - Renal, and is Co-Editor-in-Chief of Bladder and Associate Editor for Journal of Urology. His peers have recognized his significant contributions to the field by honoring him with the American Urological Association’s Victor A. Politano Award for outstanding work in treatment of urinary incontinence and innovations in bladder research and the Society of Urodynamics, Female Pelvic Medicine & Urogenital Reconstruction’s Distinguished Service Award for outstanding contributions to urodynamics, female urology and voiding dysfunction, and exemplary service to the Society.

One or more keywords matched the following items that are connected to Chai, Toby

Item TypeName
Concept Erectile Dysfunction
Academic Article Preoperative hesitating urinary stream is associated with postoperative voiding dysfunction and surgical failure following Burch colposuspension or pubovaginal rectus fascial sling surgery.
Award or Honor Receipt Paul Zimskind Award, For Continuing Excellence and Leadership In Field of Voiding Dysfunction
Academic Article Mouse urothelial genes associated with voiding behavior changes after ovariectomy and bladder lipopolysaccharide exposure.
Academic Article Caloric Restriction and Aging Bladder Dysfunction.
Academic Article Effects of concomitant surgeries during midurethral slings (MUS) on postoperative complications, voiding dysfunction, continence outcomes, and urodynamic variables.
Academic Article Specificity of the American Urological Association voiding symptom index: comparison of unselected and selected samples of both sexes.
Academic Article Role of Purinergic Signaling in Voiding Dysfunction.
Academic Article The effects of drug and behavior therapy on urgency and voiding frequency.
Academic Article Dysfunction of bladder urothelium and bladder urothelial cells in interstitial cystitis.
Academic Article Sacral neuromodulation for the treatment of bladder dysfunction.
Academic Article Pyroptosis engagement and bladder urothelial cell-derived exosomes recruit mast cells and induce barrier dysfunction of bladder urothelium after uropathogenic E. coli infection.
Academic Article Salmonella infection of a penile prosthesis.
Academic Article Normal preoperative urodynamic testing does not predict voiding dysfunction after Burch colposuspension versus pubovaginal sling.
Academic Article Symposium report on urothelial dysfunction: pathophysiology and novel therapies.
Academic Article Persistently increased voiding frequency despite relief of bladder outlet obstruction.

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Search Criteria
  • Voiding
  • dysfunction