Elizabeth E. Hatch, PhD
Boston University School of Public Health
Dept of Epidemiology

PhD, Yale University
MS, Harvard School of Public Health

Dr. Hatch’s research interests are focused on exposures related to fertility and pregnancy outcomes. She has been principal investigator of two NIH-funded grants to evaluate factors related to reproductive health in Denmark. Currently, in collaboration with Dr. Wise, she is leading a five year study to continue enrollment and combine data from the Danish cohort and the similarly-designed PRESTO cohort in North America. The study uses internet-based recruitment and follow-up and is evaluating factors related to fertility, miscarriage, and adverse pregnancy outcomes, with a particular focus on diet and medication use. With support from the Oak Foundation and the National Toxicology Program, Dr. Hatch is evaluating exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals a subset of women in the cohort, and whether they may affect fertility and pregnancy outcomes. Dr. Hatch is also interested in prenatal and childhood exposures in relation to long-term health outcomes such as hormonally-related cancers, reproductive outcomes, and obesity. She teaches cancer epidemiology and has conducted research on several cancer sites including brain cancer, childhood leukemia, and breast and cervical cancer. Prior to joining the faculty at BU in 2000, she was an investigator at the National Cancer Institute, where she led a large cohort study on the health risks of exposure to the synthetic hormone, diethylstilbestrol (DES) among women exposed during pregnancy and their offspring exposed in utero. She continues her involvement with the DES study as a co-investigator of the BU DES study site, where 2nd and 3rd generation offspring are being followed for cancer and other conditions.

An internet-based preconception cohort study in North America and Denmark
09/14/2016 - 05/31/2021 (Multi-PI)
PI: Elizabeth E. Hatch, PhD
NIH/National Institute of Child Health & Human Development

The Risk of Reproductive Disorders & Childhood Obesity in Relation to Exposure to Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals
12/01/2009 - 01/31/2017 (PI)
Oak Foundation

An internet based prospective study of time to pregnancy
01/15/2010 - 12/31/2015 (PI)
NIH/National Institute of Child Health & Human Development

A Pilot Study if Internet Recruitment and Follow Up Among Reproductive Age Women
07/01/2006 - 06/30/2009 (PI)
NIH/National Institute of Child Health & Human Development
5 R21 HD50264 02

The Association Between Obesity, Central Adiposity and Endocrine Disruptors
02/01/2006 - 01/31/2009 (PI)
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
5 R21 ES13724 02

Risk Factors for Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS)
09/01/2004 - 08/31/2005 (PI)
Silent Spring Institute NIH NCI

Publications listed below are automatically derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and other sources, which might result in incorrect or missing publications. Faculty can login to make corrections and additions.

  1. Sponholtz TR, Palmer JR, Rosenberg LA, Hatch EE, Lucile AC, Wise LA. Exogenous Hormone Use and Endometrial Cancer in U.S. Black Women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2018 Feb 23.View Related Profiles. PMID: 29475971.
  2. Hatch EE, Wesselink AK, Hahn KA, Michiel JJ, Mikkelsen EM, Sorensen HT, Rothman KJ, Wise LA. Intake of Sugar-sweetened Beverages and Fecundability in a North American Preconception Cohort. Epidemiology. 2018 Jan 30.View Related Profiles. PMID: 29384791.
  3. McInerney KA, Hatch EE, Wesselink AK, Mikkelsen EM, Rothman KJ, Perkins RB, Wise LA. Re: The effect of vaccination against human papillomavirus on fecundability. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2018 Jan 05.View Related Profiles. PMID: 29315695.
  4. Wise LA, Wesselink AK, Tucker KL, Saklani S, Mikkelsen EM, Cueto H, Riis AH, Trolle E, McKinnon CJ, Hahn KA, Rothman KJ, Sørensen HT, Hatch EE. Dietary Fat Intake and Fecundability in 2 Preconception Cohort Studies. Am J Epidemiol. 2018 Jan 01; 187(1):60-74.View Related Profiles. PMID: 28595290.
  5. Troisi R, Titus L, Hatch EE, Palmer JR, Huo D, Strohsnitter WC, Adam E, Ricker W, Hyer M, Hoover RN. A Prospective Cohort Study of Prenatal Diethylstilbestrol Exposure and Cardiovascular Disease Risk. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2018 Jan 01; 103(1):206-212.View Related Profiles. PMID: 29069384.
  6. Wise LA, Wesselink AK, Hatch EE, Rothman KJ, Mikkelsen EM, Sørensen HT, Mahalingaiah S. Marijuana use and fecundability in a North American preconception cohort study. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2018 Mar; 72(3):208-215.View Related Profiles. PMID: 29273628.
  7. Troisi R, Hatch EE, Titus L, Strohsnitter W, Gail MH, Huo D, Adam E, Robboy SJ, Hyer M, Hoover RN, Palmer JR. Prenatal diethylstilbestrol exposure and cancer risk in women. Environ Mol Mutagen. 2017 Nov 10.View Related Profiles. PMID: 29124779.
  8. Wesselink AK, Rothman KJ, Hatch EE, Mikkelsen EM, Sørensen HT, Wise LA. Age and fecundability in a North American preconception cohort study. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Dec; 217(6):667.e1-667.e8.View Related Profiles. PMID: 28917614.
  9. McInerney KA, Hatch EE, Wesselink AK, Mikkelsen EM, Rothman KJ, Perkins RB, Wise LA. The Effect of Vaccination Against Human Papillomavirus on Fecundability. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2017 Nov; 31(6):531-536.View Related Profiles. PMID: 28881394.
  10. Sponholtz TR, Palmer JR, Rosenberg L, Hatch EE, Adams-Campbell LL, Wise LA. Reproductive factors and incidence of endometrial cancer in U.S. black women. Cancer Causes Control. 2017 Jun; 28(6):579-588.View Related Profiles. PMID: 28361447; DOI: 10.1007/s10552-017-0880-4;.
Showing 10 of 122 results. Show More

This graph shows the total number of publications by year, by first, middle/unknown, or last author.

Bar chart showing 122 publications over 26 distinct years, with a maximum of 14 publications in 2016

Contact for Mentoring:

715 Albany St Talbot Building
Boston MA 02118
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