Keywords
Last Name

Thomas T. Perls, MD, MPH, FACP

TitleProfessor
InstitutionBoston University School of Medicine
DepartmentMedicine
DivisionGeriatrics
Address72 E. Concord St Robinson (B)
Boston MA 02118
Phone(617) 638-6670
ORCID ORCID Icon0000-0002-2492-4334
Other Positions
TitleActive Staff Privileges
InstitutionBoston Medical Center
DepartmentMedicine

 Awards and Honors

Start-EndDescription
2010Glenn Medical Research Foundation: Glenn Award for Resaerch in Biological Mechanisms of Aging
2013International Gerontology Association World Congress: Ewald Busse Research in Gerontology
 Research Expertise & Professional Interests
Expertise in epidemiology, genetics of aging and exceptional longevity.

Dr. Perls is among the international leaders in the field of human exceptional longevity. He has been responsible for numerous novel and pivotal findings in the field:

• Intact cognitive function amongst centenarians may be a function of demographic selection in which younger elderly with poor function die off leaving behind a select group of survivors with lower relative risk for common causes of cognitive impairment such as Alzheimer’s disease.

• Twenty percent of female centenarians had children after the age of 40 compared with 5% of women from their birth cohort. The results suggest that women who had children after the age of 40 had a 4 times greater risk of living to 100 or older (Nature).

• Delayed age of menopause and therefore the ability to have more children may be an important genetic selective pressure to evolve genetic variants that slow aging and decrease risk for age related diseases.

• Relative to octogenarians and nonagenarians, Alzheimer’s becomes less common amongst centenarians while rarer causes of neuropathology become more common, suggesting that centenarians have a relative resistance to Alzheimer’s, which also correlates with the decreased frequency of the apolipoprotein E-4 allele amongst Caucasian centenarians.

• The first to report a series of families that demonstrate remarkable clustering for exceptional longevity (J Amer Geriatrics Society).

• Siblings of centenarians have markedly increased risks for survival to 100 relative to their birth cohort (Lancet and PNAS).

• The children of centenarians have approximately 60% reduced rates of heart disease, stroke, diabetes and hypertension and 80% reduced overall mortality in their early seventies compared to their average birth cohort.

• A substantial proportion of centenarians live with age-related diseases usually associated with significant mortality, for more than 20 years (40%, called survivors), another group have such diseases after the age of 80 (45%, called delayers) and then there are about 15% of centenarians who have none of these diseases at the age of 100 (called escapers). Despite this, more than 90% of centenarians are functionally independent in their early nineties.

• At even older ages however, semi-super-centenarians (ages 105-109 years) and even more so, supercentenarians (age 110+), usually delay such age related diseases towards the ends of their lives. The supercentenarians particularly do this, experiencing such diseases on average in the last 5% of their extremely long lives (J Gerontology, 2012). These findings support for the first time Jim Fries’ “compression of morbidity” hypothesis that he proposed in his 1980 New England Journal of Medicine article. The observed homogeneity of this age group in terms of the delay or escape of these diseases is consistent with their being the extreme tail of the population and that they are more likely to have genetic factors in common that confer such an extreme survival advantage.

• Dr. Perls, working with a wide range of disciplines including statisticians, geneticists and computer scientists, has led the production of a landmark article in which a genetic model consisting of 281 genetic markers predicts with 85% accuracy whom in their sample of controls and centenarians is age 105+ years (published this January in PLoS ONE). The accuracy of the model is lower, about 60% for nonagenarians and centenarians at age 100, which supports the hypothesis that the genetic component of survival to older and older age beyond 100 gets progressively stringer. The authors made some additionally important findings: the centenarians have just as many disease-associated genetic variants as people dying at younger ages. Presumably, centenarians are able to survive to much older ages in part because of the presence of longevity associated variants that counter the effects of such disease variants. Particularly for the oldest subjects in the study, most of these 281 markers presumably point to such longevity associated variants, including genes already well known in the biology of aging community such as the Werner’s gene, Lamin A (Hutchison Guildford Syndrome) and super oxide dismutase. It’s very interesting that there are variants for genes known to cause premature aging that may have the opposite effect and contribute to exceptional longevity.

• In part in order to search for functional variants associated with the SNPs noted in the above model, Dr. Perls also led an effort to whole genome sequence, for the first time, not just one centenarian, but two supercentenarians, a man and woman, both over the age of 114 years (Frontiers in Genetics, January 2012).

Expertise in epidemiology, genetics of aging and exceptional longevity.

Dr. Perls is among the international leaders in the field of human exceptional longevity. He is founder and director of the New England Centenarian Study, the largest study of centenarians and their families in the world. He is also a principal investigator of the NIA-funded Long Life Family Study. Dr. Perls is also a vocal critic of the "anti-aging" industry.

Dr. Perls is readily available for media interviews and inquiries for presentations. Please call him at 617-638-6688 or via email at thperls@bu.edu.

He has been responsible for numerous novel and pivotal findings in the field:

• Intact cognitive function amongst centenarians may be a function of demographic selection in which younger elderly with poor function die off leaving behind a select group of survivors with lower relative risk for common causes of cognitive impairment such as Alzheimer’s disease.

• Twenty percent of female centenarians had children after the age of 40 compared with 5% of women from their birth cohort. The results suggest that women who had children after the age of 40 had a 4 times greater risk of living to 100 or older (Nature).

• Delayed age of menopause and therefore the ability to have more children may be an important genetic selective pressure to evolve genetic variants that slow aging and decrease risk for age related diseases.

• Relative to octogenarians and nonagenarians, Alzheimer’s becomes less common amongst centenarians while rarer causes of neuropathology become more common, suggesting that centenarians have a relative resistance to Alzheimer’s, which also correlates with the decreased frequency of the apolipoprotein E-4 allele amongst Caucasian centenarians.

• The first to report a series of families that demonstrate remarkable clustering for exceptional longevity (J Amer Geriatrics Society).

• Siblings of centenarians have markedly increased risks for survival to 100 relative to their birth cohort (Lancet and PNAS).

• The children of centenarians have approximately 60% reduced rates of heart disease, stroke, diabetes and hypertension and 80% reduced overall mortality in their early seventies compared to their average birth cohort.

• A substantial proportion of centenarians live with age-related diseases usually associated with significant mortality, for more than 20 years (40%, called survivors), another group have such diseases after the age of 80 (45%, called delayers) and then there are about 15% of centenarians who have none of these diseases at the age of 100 (called escapers). Despite this, more than 90% of centenarians are functionally independent in their early nineties.

• At even older ages however, semi-super-centenarians (ages 105-109 years) and even more so, supercentenarians (age 110+), usually delay such age related diseases towards the ends of their lives. The supercentenarians particularly do this, experiencing such diseases on average in the last 5% of their extremely long lives (J Gerontology, 2012). These findings support for the first time Jim Fries’ “compression of morbidity” hypothesis that he proposed in his 1980 New England Journal of Medicine article. The observed homogeneity of this age group in terms of the delay or escape of these diseases is consistent with their being the extreme tail of the population and that they are more likely to have genetic factors in common that confer such an extreme survival advantage.

• Dr. Perls, working with a wide range of disciplines including statisticians, geneticists and computer scientists, has led the production of a landmark article in which a genetic model consisting of 281 genetic markers predicts with 85% accuracy whom in their sample of controls and centenarians is age 105+ years (published this January in PLoS ONE). The accuracy of the model is lower, about 60% for nonagenarians and centenarians at age 100, which supports the hypothesis that the genetic component of survival to older and older age beyond 100 gets progressively stringer. The authors made some additionally important findings: the centenarians have just as many disease-associated genetic variants as people dying at younger ages. Presumably, centenarians are able to survive to much older ages in part because of the presence of longevity associated variants that counter the effects of such disease variants. Particularly for the oldest subjects in the study, most of these 281 markers presumably point to such longevity associated variants, including genes already well known in the biology of aging community such as the Werner’s gene, Lamin A (Hutchison Guildford Syndrome) and super oxide dismutase. It’s very interesting that there are variants for genes known to cause premature aging that may have the opposite effect and contribute to exceptional longevity.

• In part in order to search for functional variants associated with the SNPs noted in the above model, Dr. Perls also led an effort to whole genome sequence, for the first time, not just one centenarian, but two supercentenarians, a man and woman, both over the age of 114 years (Frontiers in Genetics, January 2012).

 NIH RePORTER Grants

Yr Title Project-Sub Proj Pubs
2016 Long Life Family Study: Boston Field Center 5U01AG023755-11 17
2014 Long Life Family Study: Boston Field Center 2U01AG023755-09 17
2014 Long Life Family Study: Boston Field Center 3U01AG023755-09S1 17
2013 The Long Life Family Study 3U01AG023755-08S1 17
2012 The Long Life Family Study 5U01AG023755-08 17
2011 The Long Life Family Study 5U01AG023755-07 17
2010 Characterizing Human Exceptional Longevity 5K24AG025727-05 16
2010 Characterizing Human Exceptional Longevity 3K24AG025727-05S1 16
2010 The Long Life Family Study 2U01AG023755-06 17
2009 Characterizing Human Exceptional Longevity 3K24AG025727-04S1 16
Showing the 10 most recent of 29 results. Show All Results

 Self-Described Keywords
  • aging
  • centenarian
  • exceptional longevity
 Publications
Publications listed below are automatically derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and other sources, which might result in incorrect or missing publications. Faculty can login to make corrections and additions.
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  1. Sebastiani P, Perls TT. Detection of Significant Groups in Hierarchical Clustering by Resampling. Front Genet. 2016; 7:144. PMID: 27551289.
    View in: PubMed
  2. Perls TT. Testosterone Treatment in Older Men. N Engl J Med. 2016 Jul 7; 375(1):88-90. PMID: 27406355.
    View in: PubMed
  3. Ismail K, Nussbaum L, Sebastiani P, Andersen S, Perls T, Barzilai N, Milman S. Compression of Morbidity Is Observed Across Cohorts with Exceptional Longevity. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Aug; 64(8):1583-91. PMID: 27377170.
    View in: PubMed
  4. Sanders JL, Singh J, Minster RL, Walston JD, Matteini AM, Christensen K, Mayeux R, Borecki IB, Perls T, Newman AB. Association Between Mortality and Heritability of the Scale of Aging Vigor in Epidemiology. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Aug; 64(8):1679-83. PMID: 27294813.
    View in: PubMed
  5. Bae H, Monti S, Montano M, Steinberg MH, Perls TT, Sebastiani P. Learning Bayesian Networks from Correlated Data. Sci Rep. 2016; 6:25156. PMID: 27146517.
    View in: PubMed
  6. Brodaty H, Woolf C, Andersen S, Barzilai N, Brayne C, Cheung KS, Corrada MM, Crawford JD, Daly C, Gondo Y, Hagberg B, Hirose N, Holstege H, Kawas C, Kaye J, Kochan NA, Lau BH, Lucca U, Marcon G, Martin P, Poon LW, Richmond R, Robine JM, Skoog I, Slavin MJ, Szewieczek J, Tettamanti M, Viña J, Perls T, Sachdev PS. ICC-dementia (International Centenarian Consortium - dementia): an international consortium to determine the prevalence and incidence of dementia in centenarians across diverse ethnoracial and sociocultural groups. BMC Neurol. 2016; 16:52. PMID: 27098177.
    View in: PubMed
  7. Zeng Y, Nie C, Min J, Liu X, Li M, Chen H, Xu H, Wang M, Ni T, Li Y, Yan H, Zhang JP, Song C, Chi LQ, Wang HM, Dong J, Zheng GY, Lin L, Qian F, Qi Y, Liu X, Cao H, Wang Y, Zhang L, Li Z, Zhou Y, Wang Y, Lu J, Li J, Qi M, Bolund L, Yashin A, Land KC, Gregory S, Yang Z, Gottschalk W, Tao W, Wang J, Wang J, Xu X, Bae H, Nygaard M, Christiansen L, Christensen K, Franceschi C, Lutz MW, Gu J, Tan Q, Perls T, Sebastiani P, Deelen J, Slagboom E, Hauser E, Xu H, Tian XL, Yang H, Vaupel JW. Novel loci and pathways significantly associated with longevity. Sci Rep. 2016; 6:21243. PMID: 26912274.
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  8. Nikolich-Žugich J, Goldman DP, Cohen PR, Cortese D, Fontana L, Kennedy BK, Mohler MJ, Olshansky SJ, Perls T, Perry D, Richardson A, Ritchie C, Wertheimer AM, Faragher RG, Fain MJ. Preparing for an Aging World: Engaging Biogerontologists, Geriatricians, and the Society. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Apr; 71(4):435-44. PMID: 26419976.
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  9. Honig LS, Kang MS, Cheng R, Eckfeldt JH, Thyagarajan B, Leiendecker-Foster C, Province MA, Sanders JL, Perls T, Christensen K, Lee JH, Mayeux R, Schupf N. Heritability of telomere length in a study of long-lived families. Neurobiol Aging. 2015 Oct; 36(10):2785-90. PMID: 26239175.
    View in: PubMed
  10. Villa F, Carrizzo A, Spinelli CC, Ferrario A, Malovini A, Maciag A, Damato A, Auricchio A, Spinetti G, Sangalli E, Dang Z, Madonna M, Ambrosio M, Sitia L, Bigini P, Calì G, Schreiber S, Perls T, Fucile S, Mulas F, Nebel A, Bellazzi R, Madeddu P, Vecchione C, Puca AA. Genetic Analysis Reveals a Longevity-Associated Protein Modulating Endothelial Function and Angiogenesis. Circ Res. 2015 Jul 31; 117(4):333-45. PMID: 26034043.
    View in: PubMed
  11. Sebastiani P, Nussbaum L, Andersen SL, Black MJ, Perls TT. Increasing Sibling Relative Risk of Survival to Older and Older Ages and the Importance of Precise Definitions of "Aging," "Life Span," and "Longevity". J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Mar; 71(3):340-6. PMID: 25814633.
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  12. Perls T, Handelsman DJ. Disease mongering of age-associated declines in testosterone and growth hormone levels. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015 Apr; 63(4):809-11. PMID: 25809947.
    View in: PubMed
  13. Minster RL, Sanders JL, Singh J, Kammerer CM, Barmada MM, Matteini AM, Zhang Q, Wojczynski MK, Daw EW, Brody JA, Arnold AM, Lunetta KL, Murabito JM, Christensen K, Perls TT, Province MA, Newman AB. Genome-Wide Association Study and Linkage Analysis of the Healthy Aging Index. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2015 Aug; 70(8):1003-8. PMID: 25758594.
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  14. Ash AS, Kroll-Desrosiers AR, Hoaglin DC, Christensen K, Fang H, Perls TT. Are Members of Long-Lived Families Healthier Than Their Equally Long-Lived Peers? Evidence From the Long Life Family Study. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2015 Aug; 70(8):971-6. PMID: 25745037.
    View in: PubMed
  15. Stevenson M, Bae H, Schupf N, Andersen S, Zhang Q, Perls T, Sebastiani P. Burden of disease variants in participants of the Long Life Family Study. Aging (Albany NY). 2015 Feb; 7(2):123-32. PMID: 25664523.
    View in: PubMed
  16. Sun F, Sebastiani P, Schupf N, Bae H, Andersen SL, McIntosh A, Abel H, Elo IT, Perls TT. Extended maternal age at birth of last child and women's longevity in the Long Life Family Study. Menopause. 2015 Jan; 22(1):26-31. PMID: 24977462.
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  17. Barral S, Cosentino S, Christensen K, Newman AB, Perls TT, Province MA, Mayeux R. Common genetic variants on 6q24 associated with exceptional episodic memory performance in the elderly. JAMA Neurol. 2014 Dec; 71(12):1514-9. PMID: 25317765.
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  18. Bae HT, Perls TT, Sebastiani P. An efficient technique for Bayesian modeling of family data using the BUGS software. Front Genet. 2014; 5:390. PMID: 25477899.
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  19. Broer L, Buchman AS, Deelen J, Evans DS, Faul JD, Lunetta KL, Sebastiani P, Smith JA, Smith AV, Tanaka T, Yu L, Arnold AM, Aspelund T, Benjamin EJ, De Jager PL, Eirkisdottir G, Evans DA, Garcia ME, Hofman A, Kaplan RC, Kardia SL, Kiel DP, Oostra BA, Orwoll ES, Parimi N, Psaty BM, Rivadeneira F, Rotter JI, Seshadri S, Singleton A, Tiemeier H, Uitterlinden AG, Zhao W, Bandinelli S, Bennett DA, Ferrucci L, Gudnason V, Harris TB, Karasik D, Launer LJ, Perls TT, Slagboom PE, Tranah GJ, Weir DR, Newman AB, van Duijn CM, Murabito JM. GWAS of longevity in CHARGE consortium confirms APOE and FOXO3 candidacy. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2015 Jan; 70(1):110-8. PMID: 25199915.
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  20. Kaufman LB, Setiono TK, Doros G, Andersen S, Silliman RA, Friedman PK, Perls TT. An oral health study of centenarians and children of centenarians. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2014 Jun; 62(6):1168-73. PMID: 24889721.
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  21. Lee JH, Cheng R, Honig LS, Feitosa M, Kammerer CM, Kang MS, Schupf N, Lin SJ, Sanders JL, Bae H, Druley T, Perls T, Christensen K, Province M, Mayeux R. Genome wide association and linkage analyses identified three loci-4q25, 17q23.2, and 10q11.21-associated with variation in leukocyte telomere length: the Long Life Family Study. Front Genet. 2013; 4:310. PMID: 24478790.
    View in: PubMed
  22. An P, Miljkovic I, Thyagarajan B, Kraja AT, Daw EW, Pankow JS, Selvin E, Kao WH, Maruthur NM, Nalls MA, Liu Y, Harris TB, Lee JH, Borecki IB, Christensen K, Eckfeldt JH, Mayeux R, Perls TT, Newman AB, Province MA. Genome-wide association study identifies common loci influencing circulating glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in non-diabetic subjects: the Long Life Family Study (LLFS). Metabolism. 2014 Apr; 63(4):461-8. PMID: 24405752.
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  23. Sebastiani P, Sun FX, Andersen SL, Lee JH, Wojczynski MK, Sanders JL, Yashin A, Newman AB, Perls TT. Families Enriched for Exceptional Longevity also have Increased Health-Span: Findings from the Long Life Family Study. Front Public Health. 2013; 1:38. PMID: 24350207.
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  24. Sebastiani P, Bae H, Sun FX, Andersen SL, Daw EW, Malovini A, Kojima T, Hirose N, Schupf N, Puca A, Perls TT. Meta-analysis of genetic variants associated with human exceptional longevity. Aging (Albany NY). 2013 Sep; 5(9):653-61. PMID: 24244950.
    View in: PubMed
  25. Sanders JL, Minster RL, Barmada MM, Matteini AM, Boudreau RM, Christensen K, Mayeux R, Borecki IB, Zhang Q, Perls T, Newman AB. Heritability of and mortality prediction with a longevity phenotype: the healthy aging index. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2014 Apr; 69(4):479-85. PMID: 23913930.
    View in: PubMed
  26. Barral S, Cosentino S, Costa R, Andersen SL, Christensen K, Eckfeldt JH, Newman AB, Perls TT, Province MA, Hadley EC, Rossi WK, Mayeux R. Exceptional memory performance in the Long Life Family Study. Neurobiol Aging. 2013 Nov; 34(11):2445-8. PMID: 23759147.
    View in: PubMed
  27. Perls T. The reappearance of procaine hydrochloride (Gerovital H3) for antiaging. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2013 Jun; 61(6):1024-5. PMID: 23772727.
    View in: PubMed
  28. Elo IT, Mykyta L, Sebastiani P, Christensen K, Glynn NW, Perls T. Age validation in the long life family study through a linkage to early-life census records. J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2013 Jul; 68(4):580-5. PMID: 23704206.
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  29. Bae HT, Sebastiani P, Sun JX, Andersen SL, Daw EW, Terracciano A, Ferrucci L, Perls TT. Genome-wide association study of personality traits in the long life family study. Front Genet. 2013; 4:65. PMID: 23658558.
    View in: PubMed
  30. Andersen SL, Sun JX, Sebastiani P, Huntly J, Gass JD, Feldman L, Bae H, Christiansen L, Perls TT. Personality factors in the Long Life Family Study. J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2013 Sep; 68(5):739-49. PMID: 23275497.
    View in: PubMed
  31. Sebastiani P, Perls TT. The genetics of extreme longevity: lessons from the new England centenarian study. Front Genet. 2012; 3:277. PMID: 23226160.
    View in: PubMed
  32. Schupf N, Barral S, Perls T, Newman A, Christensen K, Thyagarajan B, Province M, Rossi WK, Mayeux R. Apolipoprotein E and familial longevity. Neurobiol Aging. 2013 Apr; 34(4):1287-91. PMID: 23040522.
    View in: PubMed
  33. Conneely KN, Capell BC, Erdos MR, Sebastiani P, Solovieff N, Swift AJ, Baldwin CT, Budagov T, Barzilai N, Atzmon G, Puca AA, Perls TT, Geesaman BJ, Boehnke M, Collins FS. Human longevity and common variations in the LMNA gene: a meta-analysis. Aging Cell. 2012 Jun; 11(3):475-81. PMID: 22340368.
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  34. Michael Anson R, Willcox B, Austad S, Perls T. Within- and between-species study of extreme longevity--comments, commonalities, and goals. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2012 Apr; 67(4):347-50. PMID: 22419221.
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  35. Sebastiani P, Solovieff N, Dewan AT, Walsh KM, Puca A, Hartley SW, Melista E, Andersen S, Dworkis DA, Wilk JB, Myers RH, Steinberg MH, Montano M, Baldwin CT, Hoh J, Perls TT. Genetic signatures of exceptional longevity in humans. PLoS One. 2012; 7(1):e29848. PMID: 22279548.
    View in: PubMed
  36. Andersen SL, Sebastiani P, Dworkis DA, Feldman L, Perls TT. Health span approximates life span among many supercentenarians: compression of morbidity at the approximate limit of life span. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2012 Apr; 67(4):395-405. PMID: 22219514.
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  37. Sebastiani P, Riva A, Montano M, Pham P, Torkamani A, Scherba E, Benson G, Milton JN, Baldwin CT, Andersen S, Schork NJ, Steinberg MH, Perls TT. Whole genome sequences of a male and female supercentenarian, ages greater than 114?years. Front Genet. 2011; 2:90. PMID: 22303384.
    View in: PubMed
  38. Sebastiani P, Solovieff N, Puca A, Hartley SW, Melista E, Andersen S, Dworkis DA, Wilk JB, Myers RH, Steinberg MH, Montano M, Baldwin CT, Perls TT. Retraction. Science. 2011 Jul 22; 333(6041):404. PMID: 21778381.
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  39. Kulminski AM, Arbeev KG, Christensen K, Mayeux R, Newman AB, Province MA, Hadley EC, Rossi W, Perls TT, Elo IT, Yashin AI. Do gender, disability, and morbidity affect aging rate in the LLFS? Application of indices of cumulative deficits. Mech Ageing Dev. 2011 Apr; 132(4):195-201. PMID: 21463647.
    View in: PubMed
  40. Young RD, Desjardins B, McLaughlin K, Poulain M, Perls TT. Typologies of extreme longevity myths. Curr Gerontol Geriatr Res. 2010; 2010:423087. PMID: 21461047.
    View in: PubMed
  41. Newman AB, Glynn NW, Taylor CA, Sebastiani P, Perls TT, Mayeux R, Christensen K, Zmuda JM, Barral S, Lee JH, Simonsick EM, Walston JD, Yashin AI, Hadley E. Health and function of participants in the Long Life Family Study: A comparison with other cohorts. Aging (Albany NY). 2011 Jan; 3(1):63-76. PMID: 21258136.
    View in: PubMed
  42. Solovieff N, Hartley SW, Baldwin CT, Perls TT, Steinberg MH, Sebastiani P. Clustering by genetic ancestry using genome-wide SNP data. BMC Genet. 2010; 11:108. PMID: 21143920.
    View in: PubMed
  43. Sebastiani P, Solovieff N, Puca A, Hartley SW, Melista E, Andersen S, Dworkis DA, Wilk JB, Myers RH, Steinberg MH, Montano M, Baldwin CT, Perls TT. Genetic signatures of exceptional longevity in humans. Science. 2010 Jul 1; 2010. PMID: 20595579.
    View in: PubMed
  44. Sebastiani P, Perls TT. Prediction models that include genetic data. Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2010 Feb; 3(1):1-2. PMID: 20160188.
    View in: PubMed
  45. Perls T. Health and disease in people over 85. BMJ. 2009; 339:b4715. PMID: 20028776.
    View in: PubMed
  46. Sebastiani P, Montano M, Puca A, Solovieff N, Kojima T, Wang MC, Melista E, Meltzer M, Fischer SE, Andersen S, Hartley SH, Sedgewick A, Arai Y, Bergman A, Barzilai N, Terry DF, Riva A, Anselmi CV, Malovini A, Kitamoto A, Sawabe M, Arai T, Gondo Y, Steinberg MH, Hirose N, Atzmon G, Ruvkun G, Baldwin CT, Perls TT. RNA editing genes associated with extreme old age in humans and with lifespan in C. elegans. PLoS One. 2009; 4(12):e8210. PMID: 20011587.
    View in: PubMed
  47. Sebastiani P, Hadley EC, Province M, Christensen K, Rossi W, Perls TT, Ash AS. A family longevity selection score: ranking sibships by their longevity, size, and availability for study. Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Dec 15; 170(12):1555-62. PMID: 19910380.
    View in: PubMed
  48. Perls TT. Growth hormone and anabolic steroids: athletes are the tip of the iceberg. Drug Test Anal. 2009 Sep; 1(9-10):419-25. PMID: 20355224.
    View in: PubMed
  49. Sebastiani P, Timofeev N, Dworkis DA, Perls TT, Steinberg MH. Genome-wide association studies and the genetic dissection of complex traits. Am J Hematol. 2009 Aug; 84(8):504-15. PMID: 19569043.
    View in: PubMed
  50. Givens JL, Frederick M, Silverman L, Anderson S, Senville J, Silver M, Sebastiani P, Terry DF, Costa PT, Perls TT. Personality traits of centenarians' offspring. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2009 Apr; 57(4):683-5. PMID: 19392961.
    View in: PubMed
  51. Zhao Z, Timofeev N, Hartley SW, Chui DH, Fucharoen S, Perls TT, Steinberg MH, Baldwin CT, Sebastiani P. Imputation of missing genotypes: an empirical evaluation of IMPUTE. BMC Genet. 2008; 9:85. PMID: 19077279.
    View in: PubMed
  52. Adams ER, Nolan VG, Andersen SL, Perls TT, Terry DF. Centenarian offspring: start healthier and stay healthier. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008 Nov; 56(11):2089-92. PMID: 18811609.
    View in: PubMed
  53. Terry DF, Nolan VG, Andersen SL, Perls TT, Cawthon R. Association of longer telomeres with better health in centenarians. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2008 Aug; 63(8):809-12. PMID: 18772468.
    View in: PubMed
  54. Olshansky SJ, Perls TT. New developments in the illegal provision of growth hormone for "anti-aging" and bodybuilding. JAMA. 2008 Jun 18; 299(23):2792-4. PMID: 18560007.
    View in: PubMed
  55. Terry DF, Sebastiani P, Andersen SL, Perls TT. Disentangling the roles of disability and morbidity in survival to exceptional old age. Arch Intern Med. 2008 Feb 11; 168(3):277-83. PMID: 18268168.
    View in: PubMed
  56. Sebastiani P, Zhao Z, Abad-Grau MM, Riva A, Hartley SW, Sedgewick AE, Doria A, Montano M, Melista E, Terry D, Perls TT, Steinberg MH, Baldwin CT. A hierarchical and modular approach to the discovery of robust associations in genome-wide association studies from pooled DNA samples. BMC Genet. 2008; 9:6. PMID: 18194558.
    View in: PubMed
  57. Perls T, Kohler IV, Andersen S, Schoenhofen E, Pennington J, Young R, Terry D, Elo IT. Survival of parents and siblings of supercentenarians. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2007 Sep; 62(9):1028-34. PMID: 17895443.
    View in: PubMed
  58. Perls TT. DHEA and testosterone in the elderly. N Engl J Med. 2007 Feb 8; 356(6):636; author reply 637. PMID: 17288051.
    View in: PubMed
  59. Perls TT. Hope drives antiaging hype. Cleve Clin J Med. 2006 Dec; 73(12):1039-40, 1044. PMID: 17190307.
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  61. Perls TT. The different paths to 100. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Feb; 83(2):484S-487S. PMID: 16470017.
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  62. Perls T. The different paths to age one hundred. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2005 Dec; 1055:13-25. PMID: 16387714.
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  63. Warner H, Anderson J, Austad S, Bergamini E, Bredesen D, Butler R, Carnes BA, Clark BF, Cristofalo V, Faulkner J, Guarente L, Harrison DE, Kirkwood T, Lithgow G, Martin G, Masoro E, Melov S, Miller RA, Olshansky SJ, Partridge L, Pereira-Smith O, Perls T, Richardson A, Smith J, von Zglinicki T, Wang E, Wei JY, Williams TF. Science fact and the SENS agenda. What can we reasonably expect from ageing research? EMBO Rep. 2005 Nov; 6(11):1006-8. PMID: 16264422.
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  64. Perls TT, Reisman NR, Olshansky SJ. Provision or distribution of growth hormone for "antiaging": clinical and legal issues. JAMA. 2005 Oct 26; 294(16):2086-90. PMID: 16249424.
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  65. Li-Sucholeiki XC, Hu G, Perls T, Tomita-Mitchell A, Thilly WG. Scanning the beta-globin gene for mutations in large populations by denaturing capillary and gel electrophoresis. Electrophoresis. 2005 Jun; 26(13):2531-8. PMID: 15948210.
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  66. Andersen SL, Terry DF, Wilcox MA, Babineau T, Malek K, Perls TT. Cancer in the oldest old. Mech Ageing Dev. 2005 Feb; 126(2):263-7. PMID: 15621206.
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  67. Terry DF, Wilcox MA, McCormick MA, Pennington JY, Schoenhofen EA, Andersen SL, Perls TT. Lower all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality in centenarians' offspring. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2004 Dec; 52(12):2074-6. PMID: 15571545.
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  68. Perls T. Dementia-free centenarians. Exp Gerontol. 2004 Nov-Dec; 39(11-12):1587-93. PMID: 15582273.
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  69. Bernstein AM, Willcox BJ, Tamaki H, Kunishima N, Suzuki M, Willcox DC, Yoo JS, Perls TT. First autopsy study of an Okinawan centenarian: absence of many age-related diseases. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2004 Nov; 59(11):1195-9. PMID: 15602075.
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  70. Perls T. Centenarians who avoid dementia. Trends Neurosci. 2004 Oct; 27(10):633-6. PMID: 15374676.
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  71. Perls TT. Anti-aging quackery: human growth hormone and tricks of the trade--more dangerous than ever. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2004 Jul; 59(7):682-91. PMID: 15304532.
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  72. Mor V, Perls TT. Robine and Michel's "Looking forward to a general theory on population aging": measuring functional decline in population aging in a changing world and an evolving biology. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2004 Jun; 59(6):M609-11; author reply M616-20. PMID: 15215279.
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  73. Olshansky SJ, Hayflick L, Perls TT. The hype and the reality--part I. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2004 Jun; 59(6):B513-4. PMID: 15215255.
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  74. Terry DF, McCormick M, Andersen S, Pennington J, Schoenhofen E, Palaima E, Bausero M, Ogawa K, Perls TT, Asea A. Cardiovascular disease delay in centenarian offspring: role of heat shock proteins. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2004 Jun; 1019:502-5. PMID: 15247074.
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  75. Terry DF, Wilcox MA, McCormick MA, Perls TT. Cardiovascular disease delay in centenarian offspring. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2004 Apr; 59(4):385-9. PMID: 15071083.
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  76. Geesaman BJ, Benson E, Brewster SJ, Kunkel LM, Blanché H, Thomas G, Perls TT, Daly MJ, Puca AA. Haplotype-based identification of a microsomal transfer protein marker associated with the human lifespan. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003 Nov 25; 100(24):14115-20. PMID: 14615589.
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  77. Perls T, Terry D. Understanding the determinants of exceptional longevity. Ann Intern Med. 2003 Sep 2; 139(5 Pt 2):445-9. PMID: 12965974.
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  78. Perls T, Terry D. Genetics of exceptional longevity. Exp Gerontol. 2003 Jul; 38(7):725-30. PMID: 12855277.
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  79. Butler RN, Austad SN, Barzilai N, Braun A, Helfand S, Larsen PL, McCormick AM, Perls TT, Shuldiner AR, Sprott RL, Warner HR. Longevity genes: from primitive organisms to humans. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2003 Jul; 58(7):581-4. PMID: 12865472.
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  80. Terry DF, Wilcox M, McCormick MA, Lawler E, Perls TT. Cardiovascular advantages among the offspring of centenarians. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2003 May; 58(5):M425-31. PMID: 12730251.
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  81. Evert J, Lawler E, Bogan H, Perls T. Morbidity profiles of centenarians: survivors, delayers, and escapers. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2003 Mar; 58(3):232-7. PMID: 12634289.
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  82. Arking R, Butler B, Chiko B, Fossel M, Gavrilov LA, Morley JE, Olshansky SJ, Perls T, Walker RF. Anti-aging teleconference: what is anti-aging medicine? J Anti Aging Med. 2003; 6(2):91-106. PMID: 14614799.
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  83. Butler RN, Fossel M, Harman SM, Heward CB, Olshansky SJ, Perls TT, Rothman DJ, Rothman SM, Warner HR, West MD, Wright WE. Is there an antiaging medicine? J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2002 Sep; 57(9):B333-8. PMID: 12196485.
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  84. Perls T, Kunkel LM, Puca AA. The genetics of exceptional human longevity. J Mol Neurosci. 2002 Aug-Oct; 19(1-2):233-8. PMID: 12212788.
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  85. Perls T, Puca A. The genetics of aging-- implications for pharmacogenomics. Pharmacogenomics. 2002 Jul; 3(4):469-84. PMID: 12164771.
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  86. Fillit HM, Butler RN, O'Connell AW, Albert MS, Birren JE, Cotman CW, Greenough WT, Gold PE, Kramer AF, Kuller LH, Perls TT, Sahagan BG, Tully T. Achieving and maintaining cognitive vitality with aging. Mayo Clin Proc. 2002 Jul; 77(7):681-96. PMID: 12108606.
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  87. Perls TT, Wilmoth J, Levenson R, Drinkwater M, Cohen M, Bogan H, Joyce E, Brewster S, Kunkel L, Puca A. Life-long sustained mortality advantage of siblings of centenarians. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2002 Jun 11; 99(12):8442-7. PMID: 12060785.
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  88. Perls T, Kunkel L, Puca A. The genetics of aging. Curr Opin Genet Dev. 2002 Jun; 12(3):362-9. PMID: 12076681.
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  89. Silver MH, Newell K, Brady C, Hedley-White ET, Perls TT. Distinguishing between neurodegenerative disease and disease-free aging: correlating neuropsychological evaluations and neuropathological studies in centenarians. Psychosom Med. 2002 May-Jun; 64(3):493-501. PMID: 12021423.
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  90. Perls T. Genetic and environmental influences on exceptional longevity and the AGE nomogram. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2002 Apr; 959:1-13. PMID: 11976180.
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  91. Perls T, Kunkel LM, Puca AA. The genetics of exceptional human longevity. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2002 Feb; 50(2):359-68. PMID: 12028221.
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  92. Perls T, Levenson R, Regan M, Puca A. What does it take to live to 100? Mech Ageing Dev. 2002 Jan; 123(2-3):231-42. PMID: 11718815.
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  93. Puca AA, Daly MJ, Brewster SJ, Matise TC, Barrett J, Shea-Drinkwater M, Kang S, Joyce E, Nicoli J, Benson E, Kunkel LM, Perls T. A genome-wide scan for linkage to human exceptional longevity identifies a locus on chromosome 4. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2001 Aug 28; 98(18):10505-8. PMID: 11526246.
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  94. Perls TT, Fretts RC. The evolution of menopause and human life span. Ann Hum Biol. 2001 May-Jun; 28(3):237-45. PMID: 11393331.
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  95. Silver MH, Jilinskaia E, Perls TT. Cognitive functional status of age-confirmed centenarians in a population-based study. J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2001 May; 56(3):P134-40. PMID: 11316831.
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  96. Vijg J, Perls T, Franceschi C, van Orsouw NJ. BRCA1 gene sequence variation in centenarians. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2001 Apr; 928:85-96. PMID: 11795532.
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  97. Perls T. Genetic and phenotypic markers among centenarians. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2001 Feb; 56(2):M67-70. PMID: 11213277.
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  98. Perls T, Shea-Drinkwater M, Bowen-Flynn J, Ridge SB, Kang S, Joyce E, Daly M, Brewster SJ, Kunkel L, Puca AA. Exceptional familial clustering for extreme longevity in humans. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2000 Nov; 48(11):1483-5. PMID: 11083328.
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  99. Perls T, Terry DF, Silver M, Shea M, Bowen J, Joyce E, Ridge SB, Fretts R, Daly M, Brewster S, Puca A, Kunkel L. Centenarians and the genetics of longevity. Results Probl Cell Differ. 2000; 29:1-20. PMID: 10838692.
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  100. Hitt R, Young-Xu Y, Silver M, Perls T. Centenarians: the older you get, the healthier you have been. Lancet. 1999 Aug 21; 354(9179):652. PMID: 10466675.
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  101. Khrapko K, Bodyak N, Thilly WG, van Orsouw NJ, Zhang X, Coller HA, Perls TT, Upton M, Vijg J, Wei JY. Cell-by-cell scanning of whole mitochondrial genomes in aged human heart reveals a significant fraction of myocytes with clonally expanded deletions. Nucleic Acids Res. 1999 Jun 1; 27(11):2434-41. PMID: 10325435.
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  102. Perls TT, Bochen K, Freeman M, Alpert L, Silver MH. Validity of reported age and centenarian prevalence in New England. Age Ageing. 1999 Mar; 28(2):193-7. PMID: 10350418.
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  103. Perls TT, Bubrick E, Wager CG, Vijg J, Kruglyak L. Siblings of centenarians live longer. Lancet. 1998 May 23; 351(9115):1560. PMID: 10326548.
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  104. Silver M, Newell K, Hyman B, Growdon J, Hedley-Whyte ET, Perls T. Unraveling the mystery of cognitive changes in old age: correlation of neuropsychological evaluation with neuropathological findings in the extreme old. Int Psychogeriatr. 1998 Mar; 10(1):25-41. PMID: 9629522.
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  105. Perls TT. Centenarians prove the compression of morbidity hypothesis, but what about the rest of us who are genetically less fortunate? Med Hypotheses. 1997 Nov; 49(5):405-7. PMID: 9421805.
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  106. Perls TT, Alpert L, Fretts RC. Middle-aged mothers live longer. Nature. 1997 Sep 11; 389(6647):133. PMID: 9296486.
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  107. Perls TT. Acute care costs of the oldest old. Hosp Pract (1995). 1997 Jul 15; 32(7):123-4, 129-32, 137. PMID: 9227662.
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  108. Perls TT, Wood ER. Acute care costs of the oldest old: they cost less, their care intensity is less, and they go to nonteaching hospitals. Arch Intern Med. 1996 Apr 8; 156(7):754-60. PMID: 8615708.
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  109. Gomez-Isla T, West HL, Rebeck GW, Harr SD, Growdon JH, Locascio JJ, Perls TT, Lipsitz LA, Hyman BT. Clinical and pathological correlates of apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 in Alzheimer's disease. Ann Neurol. 1996 Jan; 39(1):62-70. PMID: 8572669.
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  110. Perls TT. Apolipoprotein E and its association with Alzheimer's disease. J Insur Med. 1996; 28(2):114-8. PMID: 10172880.
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  111. Perls TT, Herget M. Higher respiratory infection rates on an Alzheimer's special care unit and successful intervention. J Am Geriatr Soc. 1995 Dec; 43(12):1341-4. PMID: 7490383.
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  112. Perls TT. The oldest old. Sci Am. 1995 Jan; 272(1):70-5. PMID: 7824916.
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  113. Rebeck GW, Perls TT, West HL, Sodhi P, Lipsitz LA, Hyman BT. Reduced apolipoprotein epsilon 4 allele frequency in the oldest old Alzheimer's patients and cognitively normal individuals. Neurology. 1994 Aug; 44(8):1513-6. PMID: 8058160.
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  114. Perls TT, Morris JN, Ooi WL, Lipsitz LA. The relationship between age, gender and cognitive performance in the very old: the effect of selective survival. J Am Geriatr Soc. 1993 Nov; 41(11):1193-201. PMID: 8227893.
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  115. Castle SC, Norman DC, Perls TT, Chang MP, Yoshikawa TT, Makinodan T. Analysis of cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction and T cell proliferative response in elderly nursing home patients: an approach to identifying immunodeficient patients. Gerontology. 1990; 36(4):217-29. PMID: 2272525.
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